Publications

The ALRC produces a range of publications including:

  • Inquiry Reports,
  • Consultation Documentation,
  • Information sheets, and
  • Reform Journal

The ALRC is committed to improving public access to its work and all past reports and recent consultation papers are available for free viewing and download via this website. 

Some publications are available in book format for purchase.

15.02.2009

Review of Secrecy Laws: Inquiry Snapshot

To facilitate communication about the nature and focus of this Inquiry the ALRC released an overview document, Review of Secrecy Laws—Inquiry Snapshot, in February 2009.Itis written in plain language and provides a ready access to information about the Inquiry and is available online as a virtual document.

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15.12.2008

Review of Secrecy Laws (IP 34)

IP 34 (released December 2008) is the first consultation document produced during the course of the Secrecy Inquiry. It identifies the main issues relevant to the Inquiry, provides background information and encourages informed community participation.View IP 34 in HTML on the AustLII website.

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12.08.2008

For Your Information: Australian Privacy Law and Practice (ALRC Report 108)

ALRC Report 108 (tabled August 2008) represents the culmination of a 28-month inquiry into the extent to which the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) and related laws continue to provide an effective framework for the protection of privacy in Australia.This Inquiry resulted in a three-volume report, containing 74 chapters and 295 recommendations for reform.The central theme

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28.02.2008

Ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

28 February 2008: ALRC submission in relation to the possible ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Thank you for the opportunity to take part in the consulation process regarding possible ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC)

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12.02.2008

Privilege in Perspective: Client Legal Privilege in Federal Investigations (ALRC Report 107)

ALRC Report 107 (tabled 13 February 2008) is the final report of the ALRC’s Client Legal Privilege Inquiry.The ALRC’s research identified over 40 federal bodies with coercive information-gathering powers (as well as Royal Commissions established from time to time) and many more than 40 statutes that addressed the powers of these bodies. Many of these

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12.12.2007

Submission to NSW Legislative Council on the publication of names of children involved in criminal proceedings

12 December 2007: The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) makes the following submission to the NSW Legislative Council’s Standing Committee on Law and Justice in relation to the prohibition on the publication of names of children involved in criminal proceedings.In making this submission, the ALRC draws on its experience from current and past inquiries. In

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26.09.2007

Client Legal Privilege in Federal Investigatory Bodies (DP 73)

DP 73 was released on 26 September 2007, the second consultation document in this inquiry. View DP 73 in HTML on the AustLII website.

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12.09.2007

Review of Australian Privacy Law (DP 72)

On 12 September 2007 the ALRC released Review of Australian Privacy Law (DP 72), seeking community feedback on 301 proposals for reform of privacy law and related practices. View DP 72 in HTML on the AustLII website.

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23.04.2007

Client Legal Privilege in Federal Investigatory Bodies (IP 33)

To encourage public participation in the Inquiry the ALRC released IP 33, the first of two consultation papers—an Issues Paper on 23 April 2007. View IP 33 in HTML on the AustLII website

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15.12.2006

Review of Privacy—Credit Reporting Provisions (IP 32)

ALRC produced this second Issues Paper, IP 32, in December 2006. IP 32 is organised into seven chapters. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 explain the content and current operation of the credit reporting provisions of the Privacy Act. Chapters 5, 6 and 7 focus on aspects of credit reporting that may require reform. These range from minor changes

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