The ALRC is committed to improving public access to its work and all final reports and recent consultation papers are available for free download. It is also possible to purchase print editions of reports, provided they are in stock.

Search

Search results

Published on: 3 September 2014 Final Report
In this Inquiry the ALRC was asked to design a statutory cause of action for serious invasions of privacy, and also to consider other innovative ways in which law may reduce serious invasions of privacy in the digital era.This final report was tabled on 3 September 2014.A Summary Report is also available.
Published on: 3 September 2014 Final Report
This Summary Report provides an accessible overview of the policy framework and recommendations in the final Report, Serious Invasions of Privacy in the Digital Era (ALRC Report 123), tabled on 3 September 2014.
Published on: 22 May 2014 Discussion / Consultation Paper
Equality, Capacity and Disability in Commonwealth Laws was released on 22 May 2014. This Discussion Paper is the second consultation document in the ALRC's Inquiry into Commonwealth laws and legal frameworks that deny or diminish the equal recognition of people with disability before the law, and their ability to exercise legal capacity. This Discussion Paper can be accessed on this page in HTML, PDF and EPUB (ebook) format. We have also produced an EASY ENGLISH version.
Published on: 22 May 2014 Discussion / Consultation Paper
The ALRC is looking at laws that treat people with disability unfairly.
Published on: 31 March 2014 Discussion / Consultation Paper
This Discussion Paper includes proposals for reform, including for a new Commonwealth Act that would provide for a statutory cause of action for serious invasions of privacy and, in addition, other innovative ways the law might prevent or redress serious invasions of privacy. The ALRC invites individuals and organisations to make submissions in response to the proposals contained in this Discussion Paper, or to any of the research, argument and analysis provided. Submissions closed on 12 May 2014.
Published on: 20 March 2014 Issues / Background Paper
In August 2013, the ALRC received a reference for an inquiry into Commonwealth native title laws and legal frameworks. This Issues Paper is the first consultation document for this Inquiry. It is intended to encourage informed community participation. The ALRC invites individuals and organisations to make submissions in response to specific questions, or to any of the background material and analysis provided. Submissions closed on 14 May 2014.
Published on: 13 February 2014 Final Report
The ALRC was asked to consider whether the current exceptions and statutory licences in the Copyright Act are adequate and appropriate in the digital era.  The Report, tabled on 13 February 2014, is the result of an 18-month Inquiry during which the ALRC produced two consultation documents, undertook 109 consultations and received 870 submissions. The Report contains 30 recommendations for reform. The key recommendation is for the introduction of a fair use exception to Australian copyright law.
Published on: 2 December 2013 Final Report
This Summary Report provides an accessible overview of the policy framework and recommendations in the final Report, Copyright and the Digital Economy (ALRC Report 122), tabled on 13 February 2014.
Published on: 28 November 2013 ALRC Brief / Reform Journal
See original format >> Subscribe to receive the ALRC Brief directly in your inbox >>
Published on: 25 November 2013 Submissions made by the ALRC
The Terms of Reference for the National Commission of Audit ask for submissions to look at the scope, efficiency and functions of the Commonwealth government to:
Published on: 15 November 2013 Issues / Background Paper
Equality, Capacity and Disability in Commonwealth Laws was released on 15 November 2013.
Published on: 15 November 2013 Issues / Background Paper
The ALRC is looking at laws that treat people with disability unfairly. This Issues Paper talks about the problems we have learned about so far. It also has some questions. We would like people with disability to answer the questions so we can learn more about any problems you have with the law. We would also like to hear your ideas about how to make the law fairer.