20.10.1996

Making Rights Count: Services for People with a Disability (ALRC Report 79)

ALRC Report 79 (tabled October 1996) was the third report in a series of inquiries into Acts administered by the Department of Health and Family Services.This report provides a detailed analysis of the Disability Services Act 1986 (Cth). The Commission identified a number of flaws in the existing system and concluded that the Disability Services

Publications

Read more
20.03.1995

The Coming of Age: New Aged Care Legislation for the Commonwealth (ALRC Report 72)

ALRC Report 72 (tabled March 1995) was the second of three reports, which resulted from a series of inquiries into Acts administered by the Department of Health and Family Services. It identifies problems with the outdated and complicated legislation dealing with aged care services, in particular the National Health Act 1953 (Cth) and the Aged

Publications

Read more
21.12.1994

Equality before the Law: Women’s Equality (ALRC Report 69 Part 2)

ALRC Report 69 (Part 2) was tabled 21 December 1994. Part 2 of the report is about the architecture of the legal system, that is, the specific laws and practices that contribute to women’s inequality.Equality before the Law: Women’s Equality provides an overview of areas of substantive law in which gender bias is evident. The

Publications

Read more
09.12.1994

Equality before the law

The ALRC took the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) as its starting point.The ALRC inquiry found the legal system failed women in five key areas by:leaving them in the dark—women often have difficulty finding relevant information;brutalising the victim—even when women are aware of their rights, they often find

Inquiries

Read more
25.07.1994

Equality before the Law: Justice for Women (ALRC Report 69 Part 1)

ALRC Report 69 (Part 1) was tabled on 25 July 1994. Part I contains further discussion and recommendations about access to justice and violence.The ALRC found the legal system itself is a factor in the subordination of women. Equality before the Law: Justice for Women argued that the legal system sanctions and perpetuates means by which men

Publications

Read more
03.03.1994

Equality before the Law – Interim Report (ALRC Report 67)

In its interim report (tabled 3 March 1994), the ALRC recommended the immediate establishment of a National Women’s Justice Program (NWJP) to address women’s needs for access to justice. View Equality before the Law – Interim Report (ALRC Report 67) on the AustLII website.

Publications

Read more
14.04.1992

Multiculturalism and the Law (ALRC Report 57)

ALRC Report 57 (tabled April 1992) examined the principles underlying Australian family law, criminal law and contract law and the ways disputes about them are resolved, to see if they take enough account of the cultural diversity of Australian society.The report reviewed the extent to which the law recognises, accommodates, respects and protects the rights

Publications

Read more
09.04.1992

Multiculturalism and the law

During the course of the inquiry, several consultation papers were released:An issues paper—Multiculturalism and the Law (ALRC IP 9) in 1990; andThree discussion papers in 1991—Multiculturalism: Family Law (ALRC DP 46); Multiculturalism: Criminal Law (ALRC DP 48); and Multiculturalism: Consumer Contracts (ALRC DP 49).The final report (ALRC Report 57) examined the principles underlying Australian family

Inquiries

Read more
12.06.1986

Aboriginal Customary Laws

The ALRC received terms of reference for this inquiry on 9 February 1977.During the course of the inquiry, three Discussion Papers were produced:Aboriginal Customary Law — Recognition? (ALRC DP 17) in 1980;Aboriginal Customary Law — Marriage, Children and the Distribution of Property (ALRC DP 18) in 1982; andAboriginal Customary Law — Criminal Law, Evidence and

Inquiries

Read more
11.06.1986

Recognition of Aboriginal Customary Laws (ALRC Report 31)

The focus of ALRC Report 31 (tabled 12 June 1986) was whether it would be desirable to apply, either in whole or in part, Aboriginal customary law to Indigenous peoples—generally or in particular areas or to those living in tribal communities only. In addition, the report addressed whether in criminal cases existing courts should be able

Publications

Read more